Premier financial magazine bullish on Chinese stocks market

Chinese stocks market surged on Monday with benchmark indices in Shanghai and Shenzhen jumping over 5 percent, mak

ing daily turnover break through 1.04 trillion yuan ($155.5 billion), a new record since 2015. The Barron’s, a fin

ancial weekly published by Dow Jones & Company, said the performance of Chinese stocks is much better than the S&

P 500. Global investment management corporation BlackRock also suggested lasting gains of the bull market.

Barron’s said the CSI 300 index, which tracks the largest stocks traded in the Shanghai and Shenzhen

stock exchanges, rose 6 percent on Monday, with a year-to-date gain of nearly 24 percent, twice the gai

n in the S&P 500, making the CSI 300 index one of the best performing indices globally in 2019.

The ongoing finance sector reforms and further industry open-up could also help boost the Chinese economy and the stock market, the Barron’s report said.

China’s financial system has great potential in helping stabilize the economy, a previous China Daily report said, adding that the co

untry will deepen supply-side structural reform in the financial sector and strengthen the sector’s ability to serve the real economy.

stgongchen.cn

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences endu

  red a series of missteps leading up to the telecast, beginning with the proposal to introduce a “popular film” category. That id

ea was quickly scuttled, as was a subsequent plan to move four awards into the commercial breaks to help st

reamline the ceremony, which prompted a rebellion from Academy members.

  In between, Kevin Hart was chosen to host the awards, before the resurfacing of homophobic socia

l-media posts prompted the comic to withdraw. After a period of confusion, it was finally co

nfirmed the awards would be mounted without a host, the first time that’s happened in 30 years.

  Much of the tumult surrounding the 91st annual Oscars can be traced back to la

st year’s awards — and more specifically, a precipitous ratings decline, fall

ing to an all-time low. Shortening the ceremony to three hours, or close to it, has been among the solutions that host net

work ABC has advocated as a means of stopping the bleeding from a Nielsen standpoint.

7893396.cn

Controversial Serena Williams cartoon ruled not to have br

  A widely criticized Australian newspaper cartoon showing tennis legen

d Serena Williams jumping up and down next to a broken racket and a pa

cifier which she had spat out was not racist, according to the country’s media watchdog.

  The Australian Press Council ruled that the drawing, published by Murdoch group newspaper the Hera

ld Sun, did not breach Australia’s press standards and instead was capturing Williams’ “on-co

urt tantrum” at the 2018 US Open final “using satire, caricature, exaggeration and humor.”

  The cartoon was published shortly after the bad-tempered final, in which Wi

lliams had a dispute with the umpire over his allegedly sexist treatment. The pr

ess watchdog received a number of complaints about the image, which drew international condemnation.

  The press council said the newspaper “was depicting the moment when, in a high

ly animated tantrum, Ms Williams smashed a racquet and loudly abused the ch

air umpire, calling him a thief, a liar and threatening that he would never umpire her matches again.

www.7893391.cn

delivery people consider their job ‘promising’ Surveyter tra

  BEIJING – A recent survey by China’s State Post Bureau said 35.8 percent of delivery workers c

onsidered their occupation “promising” and would like to continue in that position.

  The survey consisted of 6,000 delivery people across China mostly born in the 1980s and 1990s.

  About 76 percent of the delivery workers are from rural areas, wh

ile nearly 16 percent are from towns or counties, according to the survey.

  Major sources of stress for delivery workers include low wages and insufficient benefits, lack of understanding of t

heir job from customers and the public, long working hours and little chances of promotion, the survey said.

  Most of those surveyed earn less than 5,000 yuan ($743) per month but gen

erally gain more during the annual Double 11 online shopping spree in No

vember, during which over 80 percent of the country’s delivery workers handle more than 200 packages per day.

  China’s express delivery industry is rapidly developing, with around 3 million delivery workers.

  ”Delivery worker” was added to the revision of the national occupation list of China in 2015, meaning it has been recognized by the state as an occupation.

7893515.cn

Polls across the country were scheduled to open at 8 a.m

  (2 a.m. ET) and close at 2 p.m. (8 a.m. ET) Saturday, but reports soon emerged of widespread delays.

  In the megacity of Lagos, CNN visited multiple polling stations, all of which opened hours la

ter than planned. Voters said they had lined up for hours before electoral officers arrived with voting materials.

  To cast their ballots Saturday, voters were expected to complete an accreditation process in which officials from Nigeria’s Independent National Elec

toral Commission take their fingerprints and scan their permanent voting cards.

  A nurse told CNN she turned up at a polling station after working a night shift, only to face a long wait.

  ”I am supposed to be resting now, but I came to the polling station (at) 7:30 a.m. thinking they the electoral commissi

on officials) will be here, but it’s two hours now, and they have not come,” Juliet Emoedin said.

  Festus Okoye, a national commissioner for the electoral commission, sa

id stations that opened late would close an hour later, according to the Nigerian Television Authority, the state

shlfat.com

Iranians are paying for US sanctions with their health

  Ali only had two hours to save his baby’s life. He careened through traffic and sped along highway

s to an east Tehran government pharmacy. When he saw some 800 people queued outside the fac

ility, he dropped to his knees. Like him, they were waiting to obtain state-funded medications.

  ”I cried and screamed, begging people to let me get through,” Ali — whom we have not fully identified for security reasons — recalls.

  Eventually, he skipped the line and returned with the medicine in time for his one-year-old daughter, Dory, to recover.The incid

ent happened just as Iran’s landmark nuclear deal with six world powers led by the US was being sig

ned in 2015. It was a moment when Iranian President Hassan Rouhani had promised Iranians an easier life, free of me

dicinal and food shortages, and where desperate scenes such as Ali’s outside the pharmacy would become a thing of the past.

  Iran was halting its nuclear program in exchange for international sanctions relief, appearing to turn the pa

ge on a 36-year history of diplomatic and economic

qianpadat.com

A US State Department spokesperson has told CNN that

  US sanctions have exempted medical goods. “The United States maintains broad authorizations that allow for the sale of agricultu

ral commodities, food, medicine, and medical devices by US persons or from the United States to Iran,” the spokesperson said.

  Budget over emotions

  A middle-aged man suffering from lung cancer writhes and squirms on his hospital b

ed as Dr. Behrouz Emami checks on him. His eyes bulge as he gasps for air through an oxygen mask.

  The cancer has metastasized to the man’s brain, Emami explains. The doctor has recommended

to the patient’s family that he be sent to a private ward where he can spend his final days with his family.

  But the family simply cannot afford it, says Emami. They must settle for daily visits of just one-hour a day at the government-funded ward.

  ”The decisions of families are not made by their emotions. They decide based on their budget,” explains Emami.

qianpadae.com

Emami recalls a family meeting in which an elderly woman’s

  children decided to go against his advice to discharge their mother with Alzheimer’s disease: “(The children) told me the patient is yours. We don’t have any money to spend on her.”

  ”I explained to the children that when she stays here, it means that her life expectancy is reduced by 80% … it means that she may have an infection and means the lady will die much sooner,” says Emami.Accompanied by her mother, 5-year-ol

d Dory visits Ali at work wearing a tutu skirt and a coat with leopard print. He carries her behind the bar where she pl

ays with empty juice dispensers. Later she settles on his lap and plays games on his smartphone.

  Trump admin pushes for tougher action on Iran, swipes at Europe

  It’s a break from her shuttling between home and the hospital, which she must visit at lea

st once a week. Sometimes the doctors determine that she has to stay in her hospital bed for sev

eral weeks. It’s a routine that will continue until she’s 18-years-old, her father says.

  But Ali says he’s dedicated to helping her have a normal life: “It doesn’t matter what Trump’s sanctions do, I’ll do whatever it takes to find her medication.”

  He puts a hand on his chest, puffing up his skinny frame. “I’ll even fly myself to get them for her. Whatever it takes.”

qianpadbe.com

Iran parades missile during anniversary of US Embassy takeover

  Iran commemorated the 38th anniversary of the US Embassy takeover Saturday with a potent missile display as thousands of de

monstrators gathered in Tehran to mark the event that triggered the hostage crisis and sparked the decades-old rift in US-Iranian relations.

  On November 4, 1979, Iranian student revolutionaries climbed over the walls of the US E

mbassy in Tehran and seized dozens of Americans, holding them hostage for 444 days.

  The former embassy compound is known locally as the “den of espionage,” and protests take place in front of it annually.

  One of Iran’s most powerful missiles, the Qadr, was prominently featured Saturday, along with anti-US and anti-Israel signs and chanting.

  The medium-range missile is liquid-fueled, with a range of 2,000 kilometers (1,243 miles), a

ccording to the semiofficial Fars News agency, which says it can reach as far as Israel.

  ”The new version of Qadr H can be launched from mobile platforms or silos in different positi

ons and can escape missile defense shields due to their radar-evading capability,” Fars reported.

  Trump says Iran violating nuclear agreement, threatens to pull out of deal

  Crowds chanted slogans condemning Washington’s policies toward Iran and shouted “Down With the US.”

  The US-Iranian relationship has grown even more strained in recent months, espec

ially after President Donald Trump publicly renounced the Iran nuclear deal in October, refusing to recer

tify the 2015 multilateral agreement in an effort to initiate tougher and more wide-ranging restrictions on Tehran.

www.qhfaaa.com

Iranians attack police after women detained for wearing

  group of Iranians attacked a morality police van in Tehran last week after two young women were detained for “impro

perly” wearing a compulsory headscarf, according to state-owned Iranian media and activists.

  Officers fired shots into the air to disperse the crowd of people who to

re off one of the doors of the vehicle, according to a report by the state-owned IRNA news age

ncy about the February 15 incident. Iran’s morality police are tasked with enforcing the country’s strict social rules.

  The group prevented the officers from driving the women away, IRNA said citing an un

named police official. The standoff ended when the women were released from the van, according to the police source.

  The incident took place in the East Tehran neighborhood of Nar

mak, where Iran’s hardline former President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad lives.

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